The Run on Less crosscountry roadshow will begin at different points across the country and converge at the North American Commercial Vehicle NACV show in Atlanta in September
The first Run on Less cross-country roadshow began at different points across the country in September 2017.

A challenge to the nation’s truck drivers

As we head into the New Year, I am issuing a challenge to each and every truck driver to do what they can to improve the fuel economy of the trucks they drive.

While I am always grateful to truckers who haul all the things we want and need, at this time of year when the seasonal demand for shipping is overwhelming I am even more impressed by their professionalism and devotion.

Driving a truck is hard work and I know the job of goods movement is challenging because of things like congestion, weather, legislation, detention, etc.

But I also know that drivers are absolutely critical to ensuring that trucks get the most miles out of a gallon of fuel. Even with all of the advancements in truck technology aimed at improving fuel efficiency, drivers still have 30% influence on fuel economy.

As we head into the New Year, I am issuing a challenge to each and every truck driver to do what they can to improve the fuel economy of the trucks they drive.

If you are looking for some ideas, check out the results from Run on Less, the cross-country road show that featured seven drivers delivering real freight on real routes over a three-week period in 2017. Each of the seven drivers is committed to doing his part to be as fuel efficient as possible. And there are a lot more drivers of new trucks as well as older models that are laser-focused on squeezing every last tenth of a mile from a gallon of fuel. Check out some of the conversations that take place on the 9+ MPG Club’s Facebook Page.

Drivers are only one part of the fuel economy equation, and I know they can’t control every aspect of the vehicle. Of course great fuel economy starts with a properly spec’d truck, but once it is on the road, the way drivers start and stop, the speed they travel at, the amount of time they spend using cruise control all help determine whether that truck gets 6, 7, 8, 9 or 10 miles out of a gallon of fuel.

I have a great deal of respect for drivers and understand the challenges they face every day as they try to get goods to the people who need them. And as a result of my respect for their professionalism, I am confident they can rise to the challenge of moving their MPGs up in 2019. Remember even a little increase is a big deal.

TAGS: News Fuel
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